Boog City #36

Boog City 36, Sept. 2006 Available featuring: ***Our Music section, edited by Jon Berger*** ³I remember ŒYour Mom¹s Car¹ and just being like you know, Œthat¹s a classic,¹² says Sidewalk […]

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Boog City 36, Sept. 2006

Available

featuring:

***Our Music section, edited by Jon Berger***

³I remember ŒYour Mom¹s Car¹ and just being like you know, Œthat¹s a
classic,¹² says Sidewalk Café¹s Monday night open mic host Lach. ³[Erin]
inhabits her songs when she performs. When she gets to the sad part, you
feel this sadness emanating from her. She knows the right word for the right
time to send shivers down your spine.² –from Resilient Regan Resonates:
Southern Baptist Makes Good Music in East Village by Nicole Chin

³Larissa Shmailo is a performer who has played the Knitting Factory and
various radio stations. She clearly knows how to read, enlivening her
rhythmic work with strong presentation and excellent delivery. Many of the
poems could easily be transformed into songs.² –from Larissa Shmailo¹s CD
is Reviewed by Jonathan Berger

***Our Printed Matter section, edited by Mark Lamoureux***

³[Gary] Sullivan¹s view is up-close and truncated, abstracting signs and
graffiti to language and context-less collages‹Cyrillic, Roman, and Arabic
fonts merging to form a sensuous and scintillating mélange.² –from A Walk
Down Amnesia Lane, Elsewhere #2 reviewed by Lamoureux

³Reading poet and painter Kate Greenstreet¹s chapbook, Learning the
Language, I had the sensation of being privy to a particular ³over-mind,²
where many slippery and illuminating thoughts dart by to be studied, or
merely observed.² –from Mind Over Over-Mind, Learning the Language reviewed
by Jennifer Firestone

***Our Politics section, edited by Christina Strong***

³My first street festival, not including those church bazaars and the white
elephant Rice Krispies with marshmallow affairs usually held in parking
lots, was the Italian festival in the south end of Hartford, Conn. One went
whether they were Italian or not and there was nothing arty or political
about it.² –from No Fried Dough or Sausages, Please by Strong

–Gloucester, Mass.’s James Cook with the poem Third Base

A couple of mammals with furs & helmets
outwith my slack internment
all remembered this I lost

***Our Features section, edited by Stephen Dignan***

³A woman in a pea-green overcoat buys a beef roast. ŒIt might cost a little
more,¹ she says, Œbut this boy sells the sweetest, juiciest pot roast I ever
ate in my life. Tell your Daddy ³hello² for me, son.¹² –Old and Young Sell
Their Wares: Visiting the Union Square Farmers¹ Market by Dignan

***Art editor Brenda Iijima brings us work from The Bronx’s Johnathan
Neal***

***Our Poetry section, edited by Laura Elrick and Rodrigo Toscano***

–The Upper East Side¹s Jeremy Gardner with Tercet of Tercets (or, Traiku)

We do not claim to
{Somebody tell me}
[You have done enough]

–Melrose, The Bronx¹s Urayoán Noel with There¹s Nothing on TV Anymore
(Jan ¹06)

There¹s nothing on TV anymore.
The self-help sound bytes and the bloopers of war.
The call-in shows where middle Americans
Call middle Americans to listen to them snore
In the middling conversation of ³Which Olsen twin are you for?!²

–Olympia, Wash.¹s Zhang Er with Check-Up

How long do I have to wait here?
Write a poem
lighten these heavy prognostications.

The bee needle stabs a vein
³buzz² lights up the heart
(radiation isn¹t related to emotion, generally speaking.)
Seductive green snake curves across the monitor.

*And photos from Raymond Doherty, Mark Lamoureux, and Christina Strong.*